Pop-Up

A new exhibit puts pop-ups in historical context

7 ביולי 2016

Is Pop-up culture a symptom of 21st century consumerism? Although pop-up culture is symptomatic of our hard and fast society, the roots of pop-up art can be found in the early 13th century. Benedictine monk Matthew Paris made pop-up book “Chronica Majora” in order to calculate the Holy days; Thomas Malton followed him with an entire book about the mechanisms of paper, coining the term ‘Pop-up’ in 1775. Soon after, English landscape architect Capability Brown used 3D paper models of planned landscapes for his work.

Photo courtesy of PR
Photo courtesy of PR

When you think of pop-ups today, the first thing that comes to mind is children’s books that open in 3D forms. In reality, wherever we turn we meet the pop-up experiences in commerce and the global design scene – from pop-up shops of designers and international brands and capsule collections offered on the shelf for just a few days, to pop-up restaurants, and entertainment sites built at sunrise and folded at sunset for festivals, shows and broadcasts. A pop-up project is only available for a limited time, but advertised in advance, much like a child’s 3D book that neatly folds when the book is closed. And this is exactly what ‘Thoughts on the Pop-Up’ exhibition curator Kfir Glatt-Azoulay is requesting for you to do: step back and consider the pop-up within the context of its origins in mathematics and art.

Photo courtesy of PR
Photo courtesy of PR

The collection of works examines the nature of pop-ups, explores their limitations and presents the process, before demonstrating the duration of existence. Artists call on the reader to adopt a conscious point of view while looking at a temporary moment, thus making it eternal. Contributors include origami artist Paul Jackson, who will present ‘Ring,’ a series of 16 paper pop-ups. Each object has two cuts in different locations which produce endless combinations to see; Jackson’s work aims to raise questions about the unique situation of each person, as an individual and as part of a group. Artist David Peer will present the ‘Key,’ exploring the transformation between bi-dimensional and tri-dimensional space through different concepts in spatial sculpture. Take a look at the Kerf Stool, for which product designer Raz Omer used the technique of subtracting material from a wood surface which gave it flexibility. Ropes are used to determine the seating angle, resulting in a mix between softness and hardness in one wooden form – the pop-up element is shown through the transition between 2D and 3D. Don’t miss Shenkar fashion design student Yuval Bru’s ‘Conflict Body,’ expression and empowerment demonstrated through the pop-up in the form of a dress with predetermined volume, changing the silhouette of the body with every movement, resulting in a unique appearance. Other exhibitors include Amir Tomashov and Anna Kislitsyna. Not one to miss.

Photo courtesy of PR
Photo courtesy of PR

Till Aug 31. Tues-Thurs, 17:00-20:00, Sat 10:00-13:00. Beit Merov Gallery, 31 Herzfeld St, Holon (03-6516851/holon.muni.il)